The Restaurant Industry: Its Appearance Versus Its Reality / La Industria de Restaurantes: Su Apariencia Frente A Su Realidad


The difference between the appearance and the reality in how restaurants function is built into their current structure. A single restaurant often has the appearance of a small family-run spot, but actually belongs to a group’s collection of hospitality projects.[1] Restaurant bosses present relationships with workers as some kind of well-adjusted family operation, but this is the reality: workers are each highly monitored and treated like replaceable cogs. In fact, our industry’s workers are so cast aside that many have been reduced to combing through lists[2] of charity, emergency fundraisers and aid from customers, exposing just how little security has ever been put in place for us by the bosses.

Now, after all the layoffs, even the charity funds are in question. The increasingly common accusation that owners are misappropriating the funds originally raised on behalf of workers demonstrates how little trust we should have in the restaurant-industry bosses to look out for the future of their workers.

Recently, the owners of Jack the Horse Tavern were accused by staff of misappropriating funds and treating them as pawns.[3] As can be expected, after laying off their workers, some owners also solicited donations for the “entire restaurant team” and, of course, included themselves among the recipients, just as they include their own over-blown salaries in labor costs. According to Eater, “Oltmans and Schubert told their staff and confirmed with Eater that they used some of the money to pay their own bills, including food and alcohol vendor payments and insurance bills.” Now that restaurant industry workers have lost at least “234,000 jobs during the shutdown in the five boroughs,”[4] some are finding out that what appeared to be an employee support fund, was, in reality, only another form of infantilizing us for the bosses’ gain.

The fact is, throughout the food industry, gestures of charity or support for the “team” will be followed by using the coronavirus crisis as a tool for testing to what degree the conditions of the working class may be worsened. This has already taken place in the overt curbing of union efforts and worker organizing.[5]

The current form of restaurant marketing stresses social life and presents the appearance of hospitality groups as benevolent parents in relation to their families of employees. Of course, as exploited workers, it comes as no surprise to many of us that, in reality, charity funds would be diverted for the boss’s gain. We are not so easily misled by owners who call us “family” while robbing us in normal times, then laying us off and using the story of our plight—that they caused themselves—to rob us some more in bad times. What we need to focus on is developing our own central organization to protect the conditions of both employed and unemployed workers in the future.

The accounting teams of the bosses have not been sleeping over the last few months. They have been finding cracks and uncovering every angle to protect profits. There is a similar growing concern around deceptive practices used to qualify for PPP forgiveness.[6] The PPP giants[7] cannot so easily hide their management of funds like the smaller enterprises, but the process of robbery will be the same: avoid paying the workers and—at the same time—secure the bosses’ positions, as they consolidate debt and reconstitute the business of very low wages and long hours.

Right now we see clearer than ever the difference between appearance and reality in the restaurant industry. Appearance: workers and bosses are “one family” with shared interests. Reality: workers and bosses are antagonists locked in a fight for survival.

We need a Union of Restaurant Workers fighting and bargaining for our future together. It is time that the bosses and management in the restaurant industry collide with the demands forced on them by a collective workers’ organization. We must better our own conditions ourselves instead of taking the false appearance of “we’re all one family” as the reality. This is only a nice story that the cynical owners tell us and tell themselves while exploiting us.

After all, manipulating complex state schemes to retain profits is nothing new for the owning class. Take the entire “Tip Credit” structure.[8] Here, just when New York City celebrates the $15 minimum wage, restaurant bosses continue to apply the money left from customers as a credit toward them not having to actually pay the full minimum wage.

Again, we see the use of false appearances. The illusion is that bosses are supporting tipping systems because it generates higher wages, but in reality, they as a class want to keep labor costs as low as possible. Restaurants have a long history of being audited for the theft of this tipped money that customers assume goes to staff.[9] This fog of appearances is the basis of the illusion that those who work in the front of house somehow belong to the same class and hold the same interests as the bosses. Instead of tipping systems, the entirety of our industry’s workforce should collect competitive salaries like all skilled laborers, with total security and benefits.

Because restaurants are an unorganized sector, owners are able to shed workers like flies and still maintain the appearance of family and friends. During this shutdown in the five boroughs that has created a massive wave of unemployment, we must learn to stand against these truly backward aspects of the restaurant industry, where workers are forced to rely on false promises of charity and paycheck protection in order to survive a world pandemic.

The time of the mythical progressive restaurateur splintering sympathies within our class is over. This myth has amounted to nothing but an attempt at phony unity. The “restaurateurs” have failed to care for even the most basic interests of the workforce. It’s time for a genuine struggle to strengthen the essence of our work force and stabilize our lives. At this crucial moment in the industry, we must create an independent democratic organization to gain power and protect the interests of the workers. For the successful construction of a Union in this period of mass unemployment, and in a country enveloped in capitalist deception, we must ensure that our collective power lies in our own hands and that we utilize it for our own interests.


[1] https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-07-11/danny-meyer-took-ppp-loans-and-he-is-not-apologizing-for-it

[2] https://www.gofundme.com/c/blog/restaurant-workers-impacted-by-coronavirus

[3] https://ny.eater.com/2020/7/8/21308270/brooklyn-heights-restaurant-go-fund-me-funds-dispute

[4] https://ny.eater.com/2020/6/23/21299879/unemployment-hospitality-jobs-covid-pandemic-nyc-restaurants

[5] https://www.eater.com/2020/7/14/21315180/food-industry-alleged-union-busting-during-covid-19-trader-joes-whole-foods

[6] https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/136/PPP%20Borrower%20Information%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf

[7] https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-07-11/danny-meyer-took-ppp-loans-and-he-is-not-apologizing-for-it

[8] https://labor.ny.gov/formsdocs/factsheets/pdfs/p717.pdf

[9] https://www.workingamerica.org/fixmyjob/compensation/stealing-tips


La diferencia entre la apariencia y la realidad de cómo funcionan los restaurantes está construida en su propia estructura. Un solo restaurante a menudo parece ser un local pequeño familiar, pero realmente pertenece a la colección de proyectos de hospitalidad de un grupo de inversores.[1] Dueños de restaurantes presentan las relaciones con trabajadores como si fuera una familia bien ajustada, pero la realidad es que trabajadores están sumamente monitoreados y tratados como dientes de rueda fácilmente reemplazados. En realidad, los trabajadores de nuestra industria están tan tirados a la calle que muchos han sido reducido a rebuscando listas[2] de caridades, fundaciones de emergencia, y ayuda de los clientes, exponiendo que poca seguridad tenemos de parte de los jefes.

Ahora, después de los despidos, hasta los fondos de caridad están en cuestión. La acusación cada vez más común de parte de los trabajadores que los dueños están desfalcando los fondos recaudados para los empleados demuestra que poca confianza deberíamos tener en los patrones de la industria de restaurantes para proteger el futuro de los trabajadores. 

Hace poco, los dueños del Jack the Horse Tavern fueron acusados por sus empleados de desfalcar fondos y tratarles como peones.[3] Como se puede esperar, después de despedir a todos sus trabajadores, los dueños solicitaron donaciones para “todo el equipo de restaurante”, y por supuesto se incluyeron ellos mismos entre los recipientes, exactamente como incluyen sus salarios inflados en los costos laborales. De acuerdo a Eater, “Oltmans y Schubert dijeron a sus empleados, y confirmaron con Eater que usaron parte del dinero para pagar sus propias facturas, incluso para pagar vendedores de comida y alcohol, y facturas de seguro.” Ahora que trabajadores de restaurantes han perdido por lo menos “234.000 trabajos durante la cuarentena de los cinco boros,”[4] algunos están aprendiendo que lo que parecía ser una fundación para apoyar a los despedidos en realidad fue solamente otra manera de tratarnos como niños para el beneficio de nuestros jefes. 

La realidad es que a través de la industria, gestos de caridad o apoyo para el “equipo” van a ser seguidos por el uso de la crisis del coronavirus como prueba para ver a qué grado se puede empeorar las condiciones de la clase obrera. Esto ya se ve en acción en ataques abiertos contra esfuerzos sindicales y la organización de trabajadores.[5]

La forma corriente del marketing de los restaurantes estresa la vida social y presenta la apariencia de grupos de hospitalidad como parientes benévolos a sus así llamadas familias de empleados. Obviamente, como trabajadores explotados, no viene como sorpresa a muchos que en realidad, los fondos de caridad sean desviados al bolsillo de los jefes. No somos tan fácilmente engañados por jefes que nos llaman “familia” al mismo tiempo que nos roban en tiempos normales, para luego despedirnos y usar la historia de nuestra crisis—que fue causado por ellos mismos— para robarnos aun mas en tiempos malos. Lo que necesitamos es enfocarnos en construir nuestra organización central para proteger las condiciones de trabajadores empleados y desempleados en el futuro.

Los departamentos de contabilidad de los jefes no han estado durmiendo estos últimos meses. Han estado encontrando huecos y descubriendo cada manera de proteger las ganancias. Hay una preocupación creciente similar alrededor de prácticas engañosas usadas a calificar por perdonas PPP.[6] Los gigantes del PPP[7] no pueden esconder sus usos de fondos de la misma manera que las empresas pequeñas, pero el proceso del robo será lo mismo: negar a pagar a los trabajadores y —a la misma vez— asegurar las posiciones de los jefes, a la vez que consoliden sus deudas y reconstituyan el regimen de salarios bajos y muchas horas.

Ahora más que nunca vemos la diferencia entre la apariencia y la realidad en la industria de restaurantes. La apariencia: Jefes y trabajadores son “una sola familia” con intereses compartidos. La realidad: los trabajadores y los jefes son antagonistas en una lucha por la supervivencia.

Necesitamos una Unión de Trabajadores de Restaurantes que lucha y negocia por nuestro futuro común. Es el momento para que los patrones y dirigentes chocan contra las demandas forzados sobre ellos por la organización colectiva de los trabajadores. Tenemos que mejorar nuestras propias condiciones en lugar de tomar la apariencia falsa de que somos “todos en a misma familia” como si fuera realidad. Esto es solamente un cuento cínico que nos cuentan los patrones a nosotros y entre ellos a la vez que nos explotan.

Después de todo, manipular intrigas estatales complicadas para retener ganancias no es nada nuevo para la clase de dueños. Toma como ejemplo la estructura entera de “Crédito de Propina.”[8] Aquí, a la vez que la ciudad de Nueva York celebra el salario mínimo de $15, jefes de restaurante siguen aplicando el dinero dejado por los clientes como crédito para ellos que les deja evitar pagando el salario mínimo entero.

Otra vez, vemos el uso de apariencias falsas. La ilusión es que los jefes apoyan al sistema de propina porque genera salarios más altos, pero en realidad, ellos como clase quieren mantener los costos laborales al nivel más bajo posible. Restaurantes tienen una historia larga de ser sometidos a auditorías por el robo de propinas que los clientes piensan van solamente a los trabajadores.[9] Esta niebla de apariencias is la base de la ilusión que los que trabajan en front of house pertenecen a la misma clase y tienen los mismos intereses que sus jefes. En lugar de sistemas de propina, la fuerza laboral de nuestra industria entera debe colectar salarios competitivos como toda la mano de obra especializada, con seguridad total y beneficios. 

Porque restaurantes son un sector sin organización, los dueños pueden derramar a los trabajadores como si fueron moscas y a la vez mantener la apariencia de familiares y amigos. Durante esta cuarentena en los cinco boros que ha creado una hola masiva de desempleo, tenemos que aprender a enfrentar estos aspectos retrasados de la industria de restaurantes, donde trabajadores están forzados a apoyarse en ficciones de caridad y protección de cheques de pago para sobrevivir una pandemia mundial.

La época del mítico restaurantero progresivo, astillando las simpatías de nuestra clase se ha acabado. Este mito ha ascendido a nada mas que un atento a una engañosa unidad. Los “restauranteros” han negado a satisfacer lan necesidades más básicas de la fuerza obrera. Es el tiempo para una lucha genuina para fortalecer la esencia de nuestro trabajo y estabilizar nuestras vidas. En este momento crucial para la industria, tenemos que crear una organización democrática e independiente para ganar poder y proteger los intereses de los trabajadores. Para tener éxito en la construcción de una Unión en este periodo de desempleo masivo, y en nuestro país envuelto en decepción capitalista, tenemos que asegurar que nuestro poder colectiva está en nuestras manos y que lo usemos por nuestros propios intereses.


[1] https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-07-11/danny-meyer-took-ppp-loans-and-he-is-not-apologizing-for-it

[2] https://www.gofundme.com/c/blog/restaurant-workers-impacted-by-coronavirus

[3] https://ny.eater.com/2020/7/8/21308270/brooklyn-heights-restaurant-go-fund-me-funds-dispute

[4] https://ny.eater.com/2020/6/23/21299879/unemployment-hospitality-jobs-covid-pandemic-nyc-restaurants

[5] https://www.eater.com/2020/7/14/21315180/food-industry-alleged-union-busting-during-covid-19-trader-joes-whole-foods

[6] https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/136/PPP%20Borrower%20Information%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf

[7] https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-07-11/danny-meyer-took-ppp-loans-and-he-is-not-apologizing-for-it

[8] https://labor.ny.gov/formsdocs/factsheets/pdfs/p717.pdf

[9] https://www.workingamerica.org/fixmyjob/compensation/stealing-tips

7 Comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s